2016

As a part of the lecture Andersen could show several rock samles which all had been through an earthquake and had been trough a melt and congeal process. Photo: CEED/GKT
Published Dec. 15, 2016 3:01 PM

Several interested members of the public and researchers working with natural hazards and earthquakes were in the audience on 13. December to follow the seminar on Risk and management of earthquakes. CEED-professor Torgeir B. Andersen gave a lecture about why Italy are affected by a large number of earthquakes and discussed several aspects concerning the geology of earthquakes.

Published Nov. 9, 2016 2:01 PM

First week of November the Norwegian Research School DEEP arranged its very first intensive course for PhD students. The course Planetary Physics and Global Tectonics is the first in a series of new courses established by the school.

Published Oct. 19, 2016 10:27 AM

Opportunities for research in paleo- and rock magnetism at the Ivar Giæver Geomagnetic Laboratory (IGGL), University of Oslo, Norway with the Ivar Giæver Visiting Fellowship Program (spring 2017). Application deadline is November 30, 2016.

Earth sunrise seen out from space. The methane gas is an extremely effective greenhouse gas, effecting solar energy to warm up the atmosphere. Illustration: colourbox.no
Published Oct. 14, 2016 12:32 PM

For 56 mill years ago the climate on Earth changed rapidly and the temperature increased at least 5 degrees. Scientists are now closer to understand the climate change, called PETM, and why it lasted over 150 000 years. The answer might be eruptions of methane gas from craters offshore Norway.

Professor Trond H. Torsvik. Photo: UiO
Published June 21, 2016 4:36 PM

Today it was announced who will get the foremost awards for 2016 from University of Oslo. Gratifying was that Professor of geodynamics Trond Helge Torsvik from Department of Geosciences and The Centre for Earth Evolution and Dynamics (CEED) - is awarded the University of Oslo's research prize.

Ice-cores and data about sulfate flux over Greenland and Artica tell us more about the climate in the past. Photo: Michael Sigl
Published Apr. 25, 2016 6:36 PM

International team of climate researchers reconstructs global cooling in the reign of the Roman emperor Justinian. Ice-cores and data about sulfate flux at Greenland and Artica reveils the pasts climate disasters. Their research presented at EGU 2016; Vienna recently.

CEED on Social Media. Illustration: colourbox.no
Published Jan. 11, 2016 2:09 PM

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