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Norwegian centres of excellence

The MN Faculty hosts five Norwegian Centres of Excellence (SFF) of which one is split between the Universities of Oslo and Tromsø. The MN Faculty also plays an active part in eight SFF hosted by other faculties at University of Oslo or other institutions. The SFF title is obtained in strong competition and is assigned for a period of up to ten years, with a minimum of five years.

The Research Council of Norway has initiated a Centres of Excellence (CoE) scheme with the intention of bringing more Norwegian researchers and research groups up to a high international standard. The centres are affiliated with Norway's top universities and premier independent research institutes.

 

SFF hosted by the MN Faculty:

Rosseland Centre for Solar Physics (RoCS)

The Rosseland Centre for Solar Physics is hosted by the Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics at the University of Oslo. The centre aims to understand how the Earths closest star actually works. RoCs was established in 2017.

Centre leader: Professor Mats Carlsson, Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics.

Hylleraas Centre for Quantum Molecular Sciences

The centre aims to give important contributions to the understanding of the biology, chemistry and physics of the molecules. The centre is shared equally between the University of Oslo and the University of Tromsø - The Arctic University of Norway, with the University of Oslo as project owner. The Hylleraas Centre was established in 2017. 

Centre leaders: Professor Trygve Helgaker, Department of Chemistry, UiO and Professor Kenneth Ruud, UiT.

The Centre for Earth Evolution and Dynamics (CEED)

The Centre for Earth Evolution and Dynamics (CEED) is hosted by the Department of Geosciences at the University of Oslo, Norway. CEED aims to explore the mechanisms that link volcanism and near-surface deformation with deep Earth processes. CEED was established in 2013 and is directed by Professor Trond Torsvik.

Centre leader: Professor Trond Torsvik, Department of Geosciences.

SFF with participants from the MN Faculty:

Centre for Cancer Cell Reprogramming (CanCell) 

The research centre is located at the Oslo University Hospital and the aim is to reprogram cancer cells in order to make ways for new kinds of cancer treatment.

Centre leader: Professor Harald Stenmark, Faculty of Medicine.

Developing an integrated open access organ on chip platform for drug discovery

The centre is developing a new technology which aims to make a new understanding of the organs of the body and how different types of treatments work. Developing an integrated open access organ on chip platform for drug discovery is located at the Faculty of Medicine and is directed by Stefan Krauss.

Centre leader: Professor Stefan Krauss, Faculty of Medicine.

Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies in Rhythm, Time and Motion (RITMO)

Rythm is essential when we walk, dance and play, tell stories or we are trying to predict the future. Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies in Rhythm, Time and Motion is located at the Department of Musicology.

Centre leader: Professor Anne Danielsen and Associate Professor Alexander Jensenius, Faculty of Humanities.

Porous Media Laboratory (PoreLab)

PoreLab is a Norwegian Center of Excellence created in 2017 and situated at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, and the University of Oslo (UiO). It focuses on the physics of porous media using experimental, theoretical and computational methods. It is led by five principal scientists from physics, chemistry and reservoir engineering.

Centre leader: Professor Alex Hansen, NTNU.

Completed SFF's:

Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES)

Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES) integrates interdisciplinary scientific fields to study ecological and evolutionary processes. Understanding how living organisms respond and adapt to environmental changes remains a major and urgent scientific challenge. CEES was established in 2007 and completed as a SFF in 2017. The centre continues its work as a centre without SFF status. 

Centre leader: Professor Nils Christian Stenseth, Department of Biosciences.

Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry (CTCC) 

Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry (CTCC) was split between the Universities of Oslo and Tromsø. CTCC aimed at being an internationally reknown contributor to the development and application of quantum-mechanical modeling in chemistry and materials science. CTCC was established in 2007 and completed in 2017.

Centre leader for the Oslo node: Professor Trygve Helgaker, Department of Chemistry.

Centre for Immune Regulation (CIR)

Centre for Immune Regulation (CIR) was a research centre located at the University of Oslo and the Oslo University Hospital. The scientific goal of the centre was to identify mechanisms of immune dysregulation that contribute to autoimmune disease and allergy. CIR was established in 2007.

Centre leader: Professor Ludvig M. Sollid, Faculty of Medicine.

Centre for cancer biomedicine (CCB)

Centre for cancer biomedicine (CCB) at University of Oslo aimed towards a better understanding of the complex dynamics of cancer evolution, more accurate prediction of cancer prognosis and response to treatment, more powerful molecular based treatment – for the future benefit of the individual cancer patient. CCB was established in 2007.

Centre leader: Professor Harald A. Stenmark, Faculty of Medicine.

Centre for Biomedical Computing (CBC) 

Centre for Biomedical Computing (CBC) at Simula Research Laboratoryaims to develop and apply novel simulation technologies to reach new understanding of complex physical processes affecting human health. The center target selected medical problems where insight from mathematical modeling can contribute to changing clinical practice. CBC was established in 2007.

Centre leader: Professor Hans Petter Langtangen, Simula Research Laboratory.

Physics of Geological Processes (PGP)

Physics of Geological Processes (PGP) was hosted by the MN Faculty at the University of Oslo. It was a cross-disciplinary research centre, involving numerous physicists and Earth scientists. The objective of PGP was to obtain a fundamental and quantitative understanding of the complex patterns and processes of the earth. PGP was established in 2003 and completed in 2013.

Centre leader: Professor Bjørn Jamtveit, Department of Geosciences.

Centre of Mathematics for Applications (CMA)

Centre of Mathematics for Applications (CMA) was hosted by the MN Faculty at the University of Oslo. It was a cross-disciplinary research centre, involving mathematicians and computer scientists, but also scientists in physics, astronomy and economy. A main principal of CMA was that ground-breaking research depends on strong links between theory and applications. Classical theorists and numerical analysts with a strong commitment to theory were merged in the centre, the main focus being on topics which can lead to the future development of computational mathematics. CMA was established in 2003 and completed in 2013. 

Centre leader: Professor Ragnar Winther, Department of Mathematics.

International Centre of Geohazards (ICG)

International Centre of Geohazards (ICG) was hosted by Norwegian Geotechnical Institute (NGI). ICG carried out research on the assessment, prevention and mitigation of geohazards, including risk of landslide in soil and rock due to rainfall, flooding, earthquakes and human intervention, and the geological risks in deep waters, especially underwater slides. ICG was established in 2003 and completed in 2013.

Centre leader: Senior Scientist Farrokh Nadim, NGI.

Centre for Molecular Biology and Neuroscience (CMBN)

Centre for Molecular Biology and Neuroscience (CMBN) was a research centre located at the University of Oslo and Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital. CMBN aimed to take on a leading role in elucidating the role of DNA repair and genome maintenance mechanisms in preventing neurological disease and brain ageing. CMBN was established in 2003 and completed in 2013.

Centre leader: Professor Tone Tønjum, Oslo University Hospital.

Published Mar. 10, 2011 4:17 PM - Last modified May 3, 2018 1:39 PM