Events

Upcoming

Time and place: Nov. 22, 2017 1:05 PM - 2:00 PM, Ø467

Jan Heisig, RWTH Aachen

The origin and nature of the dark matter in the Universe is one of the most pressing questions in fundamental physics. The combination of particle physics and cosmology has proven to be a successful avenue leading to the well-established theory of big bang nucleosynthesis that explains the primordial abundances of light elements. In the similar manner an extrapolation to even earlier times in the Universe has led to the WIMP (Weakly Interacting Massive Particle) freeze-out paradigm - one of the best motivated explanations of the dark matter relic abundance measured today. However, despite an enormous experimental effort no conclusive hint for WIMPs has been found, putting pressure on the WIMP dark matter explanation. In this talk we examine new avenues beyond the standard WIMP picture. We show that scrutinizing the well-known co-annihilation scenario and dropping the commonly made assumption of chemical equilibrium between co-annihilating partners offers new phenomenological possibilities. By solving the full coupled set of Boltzmann equations we find solutions that accommodate the measured dark matter density while requiring very small couplings that are in accordance with current null-results in WIMP searches. [continued below]

(The slides will be available here)

Time and place: Nov. 29, 2017 1:05 PM - 2:00 PM, Ø467

Mauro Valli, INFN Rome

Weekly Theory Seminar, and also part of the seminar series of the Strategic Dark Matter Initiative.

Time and place: Nov. 30, 2017 10:15 AM, auditorium 3, Helga Engs Hus

Doctoral candidate Chengxin Zhao at Department of Physics will give a trial lecture on the given topic:

"Machine/Deep Learning and Neural Nets — Important techniques valuable for analysis of LHC experiments"

Time and place: Nov. 30, 2017 1:15 PM, Auditorium 3, Helga Engs Hus

Master of Science Chengxin Zhao at Department of Physics will be defending the thesis 

“A radiation tolerance study of the ALICE TPC Readout Control Unit 2”

for the degree of PhD

Time and place: Dec. 1, 2017 2:15 PM - 3:00 PM, Realfagsbiblioteket, Vilhelm Bjerknes' hus

Mats Larsson from The Nobel Committee for Physics will briefly describe the procedure and criteria to award the Nobel Prize in physics. He will then describe the 2017 year's prize – the LIGO detector and gravitational waves. 

Time and place: May 22, 2018 - May 25, 2018, Longyearbyen, Spitsbergen

Welcome to the 14th Nordic Meeting on Nuclear Physics!

The meeting in Norway will be next in the series of conferences which have been held every few years since the 1970’s with the location rotating between Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The 13th Nordic Meeting was organized in Saariselkä, Finnland in April 2015. 

Previous

Time and place: Nov. 16, 2017 12:15 PM - 1:00 PM, V414

Seminar by Anne Pluymakers and co-authors:

Pluymakers, A.1), Liu, J.2,3), Kohler, F.1), Renard, F. 1,4), Dysthe, D. 1)

1) PGP, University of Oslo, postboks 1048, 0316 Oslo, Norway; 2) Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB, Eindhoven, Netherlands; 3) Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, 3584 CD, Utrecht, Netherlands; 4) University Grenoble Alpes & CNRS, ISTerre, Grenoble, France

Time and place: Nov. 10, 2017 1:15 PM, Lille fysiske auditorium (V232)

Master of Science Jonas Gliß at Department of Physics will be defending the thesis 

"Passive UV remote sensing of volcanic sulphur and halogen emissions"

for the degree of PhD

Time and place: Nov. 10, 2017 10:15 AM, Lille fysiske auditorium

Doctoral candidate Master in Physics Jonas Gliß at Department of Physics will give a trial lecture on the given topic:

"Effects from ash and aerosols in volcanic plumes on SO2 emission measurements, in specific using UV-cameras".

Time and place: Nov. 8, 2017 1:05 PM - 2:00 PM, Ø467

Thomas Konstandin, DESY

I will give an overview over the potential impact of (recent and future) observations of gravitational waves on cosmology and particle physics. This ranges from the measurement of the equation of state of QCD and the Hubble expansion parameter to (black hole) dark matter and inflation. I will dwell a little bit more on the connection to cosmological phase transitions that are mostly interesting to future space-based gravitational wave observatories.

(The slides will be available here)

Time and place: Nov. 3, 2017 1:15 PM, Lille fysiske auditorium (V232)

Master of Science Riccard Andersson at Department of Physics will be defending the thesis 

"A Machine Protection Risk Management Method for Complex Systems"

for the degree of PhD

Time and place: Nov. 3, 2017 10:15 AM, Lille fysiske auditorium

Doctoral candidate Master in Physics Riccard Andersson at Department of Physics will give a trial lecture on the given topic:

"Imaging proton beam diagnostics, with emphasis on the target imaging system of ESS"

Time and place: Nov. 2, 2017 12:15 PM - 1:00 PM, 414

Seminar by Øystein Thorden Haug

Time and place: Oct. 31, 2017 12:15 PM - 1:00 PM, FV414

Seminar by Tobias Schmiedel (PhD candidate at PGP)

Time and place: Oct. 26, 2017 12:15 PM - 1:00 PM, FV414

Seminar by Harsha Bhat (Ecole Normale Supérieure)

Time and place: Oct. 26, 2017 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM, Store fys aud

The Strategic Research Initiatives DIATECH and REALOMICS will present status and their plans for the future.

Time and place: Oct. 20, 2017 3:15 PM - 5:00 PM, V414
Time and place: Oct. 20, 2017 2:15 PM - 3:00 PM, Realfagsbiblioteket, Vilhelm Bjerknes' hus

Lecture by Carlo Rovelli, Director of the Quantum Gravity research group of the Centre de physique théorique in Marseille, France.

Time and place: Oct. 10, 2017 12:15 PM - 1:00 PM, FV414

Seminar by Alejandro Strachan,

Professor of Materials Engineering at Purdue University

Deputy Director of the Purdue’s Center for Predictive Materials and Devices (c-PRIMED)

Time and place: Sep. 22, 2017 1:15 PM, Lille fysiske auditorium (V232)

Master of Science Tore André Bekkeng at Department of Physics will be defending the thesis 

"Development of a miniaturized multi-Needle Langmuir Probe system for in-situ measurements of electron density and spacecraft floating potential" 

for the degree of PhD

Time and place: Sep. 22, 2017 10:15 AM, Lille fysiske auditorium

Doctoral candidate Master in Physics Tore André Bekkeng at Department of Physics will give a trial lecture on the given topic:

"The low Earth orbit radiation environment and its effects on spacecraft electronics."

Time and place: Sep. 15, 2017 3:15 PM - 4:00 PM, FV414

By Jennifer Zwicker, Department of Geodynamics and Sedimentology, University of Vienna.

 

Time and place: Sep. 8, 2017 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Ø467

Ankit Beniwal, University of Adelaide

In this talk, I will present our study of the scalar singlet model. In particular, I will discuss the potential probes for electroweak baryogenesis in this model via collider searches, gravitational wave and direct dark matter detection signals. I will show that a large portion of the model parameter space exists where the observation of gravitational waves would allow detection while the indirect collider searches would not. This will motivate my ongoing study of the extended scalar singlet model with a fermionic dark matter candidate. 

(The slides will be available here)

Time and place: Aug. 17, 2017, OAC, Crete

The International Conference on new Frontiers in Physics aims to promote scientific exchange and development of novel ideas in science with a particular accent on interdisciplinarity.

August 17-26 | Crete, Greece

Time and place: Aug. 16, 2017 1:05 PM - 2:00 PM, Ø467

Luca Visinelli, NORDITA

Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), which are among the best motivated dark matter (DM) candidates, could make up all or only a fraction of the total DM budget. We consider a scenario in which WIMPs are a subdominant DM component; such a scenario would affect both current direct and indirect bounds on the WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section. In this paper we focus on indirect searches for the neutrino flux produced by annihilation of subdominant WIMPs captured by the Sun or the Earth via either spin-dependent or spin-independent scattering. We derive the annihilation rate and the expected neutrino flux at neutrino observatories. In our computation, we include an updated chemical composition of the Earth with respect to the previous literature, leading to an increase of the Earth’s capture rate for spin-dependent scattering by a factor of 3. Results are compared with current bounds from Super-Kamiokande and IceCube. We discuss the scaling of bounds from both direct and indirect detection methods with the WIMP abundance.

(The slides will be available here)