Pulsating glaciers of Svalbard behave differently

Glaciers on Svalbard behave very differently from other glaciers worldwide. They advance massively for some years and then quickly retreat – and then remain quiescent for fifty to a hundred years – before they once again start to advance.  Professor Jon Ove Hagen at Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo is recently interviewed in Apollon about Svalbards pulsating glaciers. The article has got attention by several international research websites.

50 meters high: Most glaciers in the world are classic calving glaciers, like the Lilliehöök glacier in Northern Svalbard. Its front is to kilometers wide and almost 50 metres high. Every time it calves, huge roars can be heard across the fjord. The researchers have now examined another type of glaciers that behave very differently. Photo: Yngve Vogt/Apollon

50 meters high: Most glaciers in the world are classic calving glaciers, like the Lilliehöök glacier in Northern Svalbard. Its front is to kilometers wide and almost 50 metres high. Every time it calves, huge roars can be heard across the fjord. The researchers have now examined another type of glaciers that behave very differently. Photo: Yngve Vogt/Apollon

The Nordic Centre of Excellence Stability and Variations of Arctic Land Ice - SVALI, headed by Jon Ove Hagen has studied a unique type of glacier found on Svalbard.

The glaciers on Svalbard behaves quite differently from most other glaciers worldwide.

 

Read articles in international web sites

Pulsating glaciers of Svalbard behave differently, ScienceDaily, 1.2.2016

Glaciers on Svalbard behave differently, pys.org., 1.2.2016 and SciFeeds

Weird, Pulsating Glaciers Discovered in Svalbard: How They Impact Sea Level Rise, Science World Report,1.2.2016‎

Glaciers on Svalbard pulse, reportingclimatescience.com, 3.2.2016

Svalbardbreer er ikke som andre breer, High North News, 4.2.2016

 

University of Oslo, Apollon

Glaciers on Svalbard behave differently, Apollon 2016/1

Apollon 2016/1 Theme: Nordområdene.(in Norwegian)

 

Published Feb. 2, 2016 3:52 PM - Last modified Feb. 15, 2016 7:06 PM