The Geologybuilding; Blindern and Department of Geosciences. Photo: GEO
Published Mar. 15, 2018 1:33 PM

Are you interested in a PhD or Postdoc position within geosciences at University of Oslo? Department of Geosciences is recruiting in thirteen (up to 15) positions just now! Find more information about the vacancies on our webpages.

Pangea with the The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province in red. Illustration: Research team/CEED
Published Feb. 2, 2018 4:54 PM

The End-Triassic extinction is one of the largest mass extinctions in the history of Earth. It has been hypothesized that greenhouse gases released from volcanic activity of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) triggered the extinction. New models in a recent study demonstrate that large-scale gas generation followed the sill emplacement of CAMP in sedimentary basins in northern Brazil.

Film: Triassic North Project - Svalbard Field Excursion (July 22 - 30 July 2016). Photo: Leif Bjørnar Henriksen
Published Jan. 3, 2018 1:06 PM

The Trias North Project has staged several field trips to Svalbard. Last year we invited our industrial partners to join us on a excursion. This has resulted in a great movie from one of the participating partners and his field impressions from the field trip to Svalbard in the summer of 2016. The film is ca 30 minutes long and is put togethere by Leif Bjørnar Henriksen from Statoil. The film is available at Youtube.

Tobias, photo: Private
Published Nov. 30, 2017 11:58 AM
The Hawaiian-Emperor seamount chain: Seafloor topography (bathymetry) of the Pacific showing the volcanos and submerged seamounts of the Hawaiian and Emperor Chains together with the 50 million-year-old bend between them. Image: Google Earth
Published Nov. 9, 2017 10:31 AM

Hawaii sits at the end of a chain of volcanoes running across the Pacific Ocean floor, but in the middle of this chain lies a bend of 60 degrees. For many decades geoscientists have struggled to explain exactly how and why this feature occurred around 50 Million years ago. A new study from CEED, sheds light on this long-standing geological controversy – A massive collision at the edge of the Pacific Ocean was the culprit.