Research news

Mauritius: A recently published study in the open access journal Nature Communications, documents evidence for an ancient continental crust beneath the young but inactive volcanoes on the island of Mauritius. Photo: Pixabay.com
Published Feb. 1, 2017 9:32 AM

Mauritius is best known as a tropical holiday paradise island in the Indian Ocean, but for an Earth Science research team led by Professor Trond H. Torsvik it is piece of a geological puzzle. Now they have found a new fragment of an ancient continental crust beneath the young, but inactive volcanoes on the island.

Kronebreen, Svalbard: Field Camp is settled in preparation for the 2 week campaign in August 2016. The main goal of the campaign and project was to calibrate passive seismic and acoustic instruments to quantify dynamic glacier ice loss. Photo: Christopher Nuth
Published Jan. 19, 2017 4:48 PM

Cross disciplinary approaches using both seismic recordings and satellite observations of glaciers provide data to estimate glacier frontal ablation rates. This provides new insight into the processes that control dynamic mass loss of glaciers into the sea. Such cross disciplinary approaches can be valuable in climate research.

Earth sunrise seen out from space. The methane gas is an extremely effective greenhouse gas, effecting solar energy to warm up the atmosphere. Illustration: colourbox.no
Published Oct. 14, 2016 12:35 PM

For 56 mill years ago the climate on Earth changed rapidly and the temperature increased at least 5 degrees. Scientists are now closer to understand the climate change, called PETM, and why it lasted over 150 000 years. The answer might be eruptions of methane gas from craters offshore Norway.

3D visualation in research: A 3D representation of the glacier elevation changes around Daugaard Jensen glacier from 1987 to 2014. The image is the 1987 orthophoto and the elevation change color scale ranges from ­1 to 0.5 meters per year. Data and differences as described in Scientific Data (Korsgaard, Nuth et. al. 2016)
Published May 31, 2016 4:38 PM

Recently, a Danish-Norwegian research team re-processed thousands of aerial photos into 3D Digital Elevation Models (DEM) surrounding the entire coastline of Greenland. The new data extends the precise geometric record of Greenland glacier margins to the late 1970s and 80s and can be used to quantify the decline in the ice mass, for example. The data is freely available to the public domain.

Ice-cores and data about sulfate flux over Greenland and Artica tell us more about the climate in the past. Photo: Michael Sigl
Published Apr. 19, 2016 11:30 AM

International team of climate researchers reconstructs global cooling in the reign of the Roman emperor Justinian. Ice-cores and data about sulfate flux at Greenland and Artica reveils the pasts climate disasters. Their research presented at EGU 2016; Vienna recently.