Research news

The Hawaiian-Emperor Bend:  This picture taken of satelitte show the bend as a small pattern on the surface. Photo: Google Earth, NOAA, US, NGA; CEBCO; Landsat / Copernicus
Published June 28, 2017 9:39 PM

The Hawaiian-Emperor volcanic island chain in the NW Pacific Ocean is well known for its peculiar 60° bend. This bend has been heavily debated for decades. Researchers from University of Oslo, GFZ Potsdam, and Utrecht University now definitely demonstrate that to form the observed bend requires an abrupt change in the motion of the Pacific tectonic plate, while southward drift of the mantle plume that has sourced the chain since ~80 Ma is required to explain its entire 2000 km length.

According to a new study is the global sea level rising faster than previously thought. The accelerating sea level will have impact on coastlines around the world.  Several of the World’s largest cities are near a coastline, here New York. For others see U.N. Atlas of the Oceans.  Illustration photo: Colourbox.com
Published June 22, 2017 9:05 PM

Across the globe, sea level has been rising for decades, but we don’t know how fast. Researchers have now analyzed tide gauge data and reconstructed global mean sea level since 1902. Their record yields a slower average rise before 1990 than previously thought, but similar high rates of about 3.1 mm/yr as observed from independent satellite observations from 1993-2012. This suggests that global mean sea level has been accelerating much faster than previously assumed in the past two decades.

The famous Barringer meteor crater in Arizona, which was created by an impact about 50 000 years ago. Photo: Colourbox
Published Apr. 27, 2017 2:33 PM

What has Einstein and Newton got to do with the motion of the solar system bodies?

The Earth: 'Blue Marble' NASA. See animation. Image (and animation): John Nelson (IDV Solutions).
Published Apr. 26, 2017 12:03 PM

A warming Arctic will give an extended growing season particularly due to an earlier spring, and it has been believed that this will give a greater uptake of CO2 in plants and an increased carbon sink. An impact potentially offsetting some of the anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gases. A new study suggest that the “warmer spring, bigger sink” hypothesis may no longer hold.

One of Norway's most famous paintings by Edvard Munch's "The Scream" was painted from Ekebergåsen, Oslo. There has been much discussion about exactly where from Munch painted it, but little discussion about why. This photo shows the view of the Oslo fjord as seen from Kongsveien. Photo: Gunn Kristin Tjoflot/UiO
Published Apr. 26, 2017 11:35 AM

“Scream”, Edvard Munch’s most iconic painting, shows a blood-red sky over the Oslo fjord. “Suddenly the sky became red as blood” - Munch describes this event as scaring. Was it pollution particles from a volcano eruption which caused this red sky? Three Norwegian meteorologists offer an alternative hypothesis: it could have been mother-of-pearl clouds Munch saw and painted in 1892.