Research news

The famous Barringer meteor crater in Arizona, which was created by an impact about 50 000 years ago. Photo: Colourbox
Published Apr. 27, 2017 2:33 PM

What has Einstein and Newton got to do with the motion of the solar system bodies?

The Earth: 'Blue Marble' NASA. See animation. Image (and animation): John Nelson (IDV Solutions).
Published Apr. 26, 2017 12:03 PM

A warming Arctic will give an extended growing season particularly due to an earlier spring, and it has been believed that this will give a greater uptake of CO2 in plants and an increased carbon sink. An impact potentially offsetting some of the anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gases. A new study suggest that the “warmer spring, bigger sink” hypothesis may no longer hold.

One of Norway's most famous paintings by Edvard Munch's "The Scream" was painted from Ekebergåsen, Oslo. There has been much discussion about exactly where from Munch painted it, but little discussion about why. This photo shows the view of the Oslo fjord as seen from Kongsveien. Photo: Gunn Kristin Tjoflot/UiO
Published Apr. 26, 2017 11:35 AM

“Scream”, Edvard Munch’s most iconic painting, shows a blood-red sky over the Oslo fjord. “Suddenly the sky became red as blood” - Munch describes this event as scaring. Was it pollution particles from a volcano eruption which caused this red sky? Three Norwegian meteorologists offer an alternative hypothesis: it could have been mother-of-pearl clouds Munch saw and painted in 1892.

Mauritius: A recently published study in the open access journal Nature Communications, documents evidence for an ancient continental crust beneath the young but inactive volcanoes on the island of Mauritius. Photo: Pixabay.com
Published Feb. 1, 2017 9:32 AM

Mauritius is best known as a tropical holiday paradise island in the Indian Ocean, but for an Earth Science research team led by Professor Trond H. Torsvik it is piece of a geological puzzle. Now they have found a new fragment of an ancient continental crust beneath the young, but inactive volcanoes on the island.

Kronebreen, Svalbard: Field Camp is settled in preparation for the 2 week campaign in August 2016. The main goal of the campaign and project was to calibrate passive seismic and acoustic instruments to quantify dynamic glacier ice loss. Photo: Christopher Nuth
Published Jan. 19, 2017 4:48 PM

Cross disciplinary approaches using both seismic recordings and satellite observations of glaciers provide data to estimate glacier frontal ablation rates. This provides new insight into the processes that control dynamic mass loss of glaciers into the sea. Such cross disciplinary approaches can be valuable in climate research.