2016

Earth sunrise seen out from space. The methane gas is an extremely effective greenhouse gas, effecting solar energy to warm up the atmosphere. Illustration: colourbox.no
Published Oct. 14, 2016 12:35 PM

For 56 mill years ago the climate on Earth changed rapidly and the temperature increased at least 5 degrees. Scientists are now closer to understand the climate change, called PETM, and why it lasted over 150 000 years. The answer might be eruptions of methane gas from craters offshore Norway.

3D visualation in research: A 3D representation of the glacier elevation changes around Daugaard Jensen glacier from 1987 to 2014. The image is the 1987 orthophoto and the elevation change color scale ranges from ­1 to 0.5 meters per year. Data and differences as described in Scientific Data (Korsgaard, Nuth et. al. 2016)
Published May 31, 2016 4:38 PM

Recently, a Danish-Norwegian research team re-processed thousands of aerial photos into 3D Digital Elevation Models (DEM) surrounding the entire coastline of Greenland. The new data extends the precise geometric record of Greenland glacier margins to the late 1970s and 80s and can be used to quantify the decline in the ice mass, for example. The data is freely available to the public domain.

Ice-cores and data about sulfate flux over Greenland and Artica tell us more about the climate in the past. Photo: Michael Sigl
Published Apr. 19, 2016 11:30 AM

International team of climate researchers reconstructs global cooling in the reign of the Roman emperor Justinian. Ice-cores and data about sulfate flux at Greenland and Artica reveils the pasts climate disasters. Their research presented at EGU 2016; Vienna recently.

50 METRES HIGH: Most glaciers in the world are classic calving glaciers, like the Lilliehöök glacier in Northern Svalbard. Its front is to kilometers wide and almost 50 metres high. Every time it calves, huge roars can be heard across the fjord. The researchers have now examined another type of glaciers that behave very differently. Photo: Yngve Vogt
Published Feb. 2, 2016 9:32 AM

Many glaciers on Svalbard behave very differently from other glaciers worldwide. They advance massively for some years and then quickly retreat – and then remain quiescent for fifty to a hundred years – before they once again start to advance.

If the permafrost inside Nordnes, a mountain located in Lyngen, melts, it can cause a tsunami that destroys infrastructure and populated areas. Photo: Ørjan Bertelsen
Published Jan. 21, 2016 7:32 PM

A decrease in permafrost (cryotic soil) will follow climate change and a rise in temperature. This could have serious consequences. We might see an increase in greenhouse gasses, a greater possibility of landslides and live under the threat of monster waves.