Leo Group

In the Leo Group, we study the function and biogenesis of autotransported virulence factors of Gram-negative bacteria. Our aim is to understand how certain proteins are secreted to the cell surface, and how the passengers perform their specific functions. As these proteins are involved in pathogenicity, interfering with either their export or function could provide novel strategies to combat infections.  

Photo: Unni Vik

Autotransporters, or type V secretion systems, are the simplest and most widespread of bacterial secretion systems. These proteins consist of an extracellular region harbouring the specific activity of the autotransporter, called the passenger, and a transmembrane domain called the translocator. The translocator, which forms a pore-like beta-barrel structure, is responsible for the secretion of the passenger across the outer membrane; hence the name autotransporter. There are several different subclasses of autotransporter, and in the Leo group we study type Vc (trimeric), type Vd (patatin-like) and type Ve (inverse) autotransporters.  Our aim is to understand how these proteins are secreted to the cell surface, and how the passengers perform their specific functions. As these proteins are involved in pathogenicity, interfering with either their export or function could provide novel strategies to combat infections.

Published Sep. 7, 2016 4:00 PM - Last modified Sep. 15, 2016 2:35 PM