Jowita looks at the history of the Universe

- The most fascinating thing about astronomy is that us humans, not living in any special location in the Universe, have figured out the way to learn about its vastness and evolution.

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CO intensity map obtained from simulations, showing the signal we aim to measure. From Li et al.(arXiv:1503.08833v2).
photo portrait of Jowita holding her thesis
Jowita Borowska has just graduated in Astronomy, a master's degree offered at the University of Oslo.

My thesis is about the CO Mapping Array Project (COMAP), which aims to detect the signal of carbon monoxide (CO) emission lines, that arise from various under-explored periods in the history of the Universe. The ultimate goal of the experiment is to make three-dimensional line intensity maps of huge volumes. My work has been focused on designing the methods for extracting the information about the CO signal from these maps, at the same time suppressing the impact of experimental systematics that might pollute our measurement, explains Jowita Borowska in this interview.

– What have you learned from your master studies?

– During my studies I have learned to be a part of a team, I have also become less afraid to ask questions, and I have experienced that working from home is nicer when you are surrounded by plants.

– What fascinates you the most about astronomy? Why?

– The most fascinating thing about astronomy is that us humans, not living in any special location in the Universe, have figured out the way to learn about its vastness and evolution. And we keep exploring more and more.

– Your "message in the bottle" to fellow master students is ...

– Don't stress out, everything will be fine if you like what you're doing (and astronomy is so cool)!

Tags: master thesis, master program, Astrophysics, Cosmology, COMAP By Jowita Borowska, Martina D'Angelo
Published July 13, 2021 1:09 PM - Last modified July 15, 2021 12:54 PM