Blogs - Page 2

Published Dec. 4, 2015 1:00 AM

Penguins are highly visible species for the public. Their life has been portrayed in many movies. Unfortunately they are also species impacted by climate change. In a recent publication a team led by Charles Bost used long-term data to relate the large-scale climatic anomalies in the Southern Hemisphere to the foraging behaviour and population dynamics of the king penguin.

Published Nov. 12, 2015 7:05 PM

Interdisciplinarity is a central focus for many funding agencies. The argument for this is that only with scientists working together that some of the major questions of today could be answered. In a recent paper, a collection of students and post-doc from the NorMER network explored the difference of perception of scientists in function of their discipline: social science or natural science.

Published Oct. 16, 2015 7:39 PM

Interdisciplinarity is often presented as the solution to answer some of the major questions of today. Master student Djuna Buizer reflected on the subject in a post.

Published Sep. 24, 2015 8:38 AM

The toxicity resulting from exposure to oil droplets in marine fish embryos and larvae is still subject for debate while at the same time worldwide energy demands have resulted in increased hydrocarbon extraction activity. 

Published Sep. 4, 2015 1:00 AM

Opening the sea areas around Lofoten and Vesterålen islands for petroleum activities is a highly debated topic. One of the main concerns has been to what extent an accidental oil-spill may affect the ecologically and economically important species of fish that spawn in the area. We have investigate how an increased mortality event at the egg and larval stage in cod may affect the population.

Published Aug. 21, 2015 9:06 AM

This paper investigates the scope for resilience indicators to predict an upcoming stock collapse. We find that economic information, such as profits, may complement biological information when assessing the state of fisheries.

Cava bottle
Published July 7, 2015 3:24 PM

In June this year, 50 Master students finished their degrees with the Department of Biosciences. And I was one of them! I turned in the final draft of my Master's thesis on June 1st. And on June 18th, I presented, defended, and became a Masters of Science. Once approved, Master's theses are digitally published on DUO. Read on for information about what to expect from a Master's exam and our traditional celebrations at IBV.

Published June 5, 2015 1:00 AM

A fundamental challenge for European Marine Science is to deliver scientific impact, global leadership and sustainable blue growth for Europe in times of overexploitation, climate change and other anthropogenic stressors. The Marie Sklodowska-Curie Innovative Training Networks MARmaED project makes important steps to answer this challenge by connecting science, policy and people, thus transcending national borders, disciplinary barriers and sectorial divides.

Published May 22, 2015 10:41 AM

Spatial Ecosystem models can be useful but need to be validated with data. Our study validates for the first time the spatial version of the commonly used Ecopath with Ecosim ecosystem modelling suite. We find that spatial distribution of fish species is well predicted by the model, but fishing effort distribution is not.

Published May 8, 2015 1:00 AM

In this study we assessed the chances of recovery of the Baltic Sea cod stock and conclude that it will never come back to the status it had more than three decades ago and that the economic losses associated to this new baseline amount to 120 million euros per year.

Published Apr. 24, 2015 10:59 AM

Climate warming is known to affect predator-prey relationship and phenology. Less is known about competitive relationships specifically in a nonlinear framework. In a recent study, we studied this topic on…

passerine birds.

Published Apr. 10, 2015 1:01 AM

The Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management has for many years been presented as the way to go to ensure fish stock productivity and has been adopted by many governments and international organizations. But to which extent has ecosystem information in fact been included in tactical fisheries management practice?

Published Mar. 30, 2015 8:53 PM
Published Mar. 27, 2015 1:01 AM

Many marine fishes experience tremendous mortality during their first months of life. Understanding the causes of this mortality and why it varies from year to year has challenged fisheries ecologists for more than a century. Part of the difficulty comes from the fact that many fishes have free-floating larvae. It is therefore difficult to follow a group of fish larvae over time in the field and investigate which factors cause mortality.

Published Mar. 13, 2015 12:01 AM

Since Hjort’s ground-breaking work, it is admitted that the survival from the egg to the first reproduction is an essential factor affecting the dynamics of fish populations (see post). Human activities around spawning ground may have an effect on the mortality of the younger age. One of such potentially risky activity is oil exploitation which is on the increase in the northern areas.

Published Mar. 8, 2015 4:59 PM

In honor of International Women's Day, I present the story of one seaweed scientist who unknowingly saved the nori industry and made it possible for sushi to become a global food.

Published Feb. 18, 2015 4:14 PM

Much of our present knowledge on the ecology and behaviour of animals is derived from longitudinal studies of individuals using long-term datasets. The collection of such datasets requires the ability to identify individuals repeatedly over time, i.e. by individual markings. Here comes the problems for Penguins.

Published Feb. 6, 2015 12:01 AM

The fascination for the High North is an important element of the Norwegian heritage, symbolized by explorers such as Roald Amundsen and Fridtjof Nansen. And as climate change pushes the limits of exploitable areas northward, the Arctic is again central in the political debate. With commercial opportunities facing environmental challenges, we need knowledge about the North, communication between stakeholders, and leaders with an Arctic heart. Enter, Emerging Leaders!

Published Jan. 30, 2015 12:01 AM

Europe and other funding agencies are very attentive to interdisciplinarity and trans-sectoral activities. Their ever growing demand for multi- and trans-disciplinary science is reaching such a level that making Ecology and getting funding for it becomes a challenge. Is there a way around it?

Published Jan. 23, 2015 12:00 AM

The year 2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the Norwegian oceanographer and biologist Johan Hjort’s ground-breaking work, Fluctuations in the great fisheries of northern Europe, viewed in the light of biological research. This anniversary was commemorated with a special issue of ICES Journal of Marine Science.

Published Jan. 18, 2015 3:37 PM

Some while ago a student asked us if we were collecting data in the marine ecological group at CEES. We were forced to acknowledge that we were not.  From this follows a real cri de coeur: “but we are only scavengers!” Are we really? If we are, is it all bad?

Published Jan. 9, 2015 12:01 AM

Phytoplankton biomass is controlled by a combination of “bottom-up” factors such as temperature, light and nutrients and “top-down” factors, in particular zooplankton predation. In a recent study we analysed large-scale data on ocean chlorophyll, copepod abundance and temperature in order to assess the general importance of bottom-up and top-down factors in controlling phytoplankton biomass.

Published Dec. 26, 2014 12:01 AM

In 2005 Stenseth and colleagues wrote a tribune in the Theme section of MEPS ‘Bridging the gap between aquatic and terrestrial ecology’ arguing on the mutual benefit of uniting ecologists to give birth to new science and understanding. In December 2014 we got funded a big project by the Norwegian Research Council  to do just so in Norway.

Published Dec. 18, 2014 3:47 PM

Increased sea temperature due to climate change can influence the distribution, abundance and seasonal timing of zooplankton. Changing zooplankton dynamics might in turn impact the higher trophic levels, such as fish and seabirds, feeding on these animals. In a recent paper, we show that temperature variation in the Atlantic waters of the Norwegian Sea and Barents Sea might have stronger effects on the abundance of the younger than older development stages of Calanus finmarchicus, and that these stages might appear earlier in spring during warm years.

Published Dec. 12, 2014 12:00 AM

Climate change is thought to change many aspects of the marine life. Among others, one can mention changes in species distribution (immigration of species; new species coming to northern areas), the rate of development (warmer the temperature, the faster is the development), and change in the timing of the reproduction. The latter has recently caught a lot of attention around a nearly 50 years old hypothesis of the British fisheries biologist David Cushing.