Blogs - Page 3

Published Dec. 18, 2014 3:47 PM

Increased sea temperature due to climate change can influence the distribution, abundance and seasonal timing of zooplankton. Changing zooplankton dynamics might in turn impact the higher trophic levels, such as fish and seabirds, feeding on these animals. In a recent paper, we show that temperature variation in the Atlantic waters of the Norwegian Sea and Barents Sea might have stronger effects on the abundance of the younger than older development stages of Calanus finmarchicus, and that these stages might appear earlier in spring during warm years.

Published Dec. 12, 2014 12:00 AM

Climate change is thought to change many aspects of the marine life. Among others, one can mention changes in species distribution (immigration of species; new species coming to northern areas), the rate of development (warmer the temperature, the faster is the development), and change in the timing of the reproduction. The latter has recently caught a lot of attention around a nearly 50 years old hypothesis of the British fisheries biologist David Cushing.

Published Dec. 3, 2014 10:13 PM

For the final class of my Masters, I applied to Arctic Marine Molecular Ecology at the University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS). UNIS offers classes for undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate students in biology, geology, geophysics and technology. Once accepted, I booked tickets to the land of polar bears, northern lights, and the nautical polar night for an exciting five week educational adventure.

Published Nov. 28, 2014 12:00 AM

Short supplies of adequate nesting sites and food resources are often associated in discussions of the ultimate factors controlling seabird population size, distribution and breeding success. Shift of prey distribution may affect the interaction between seabirds breeding at the same site. 

Published Nov. 11, 2014 12:39 PM

Understanding the drivers that determine the productivity of marine ecosystems is an important issue. Climate and exploitation interact in their effects, such that climate alterations may cause failure in a fishery management scheme while fisheries may disrupt the ability of a population to withstand, or adjust to, climate changes.

Published Sep. 2, 2014 3:19 PM

The University of Oslo turns 203 years old today. Gratulerer med dagen UiO! It is also the anniversary of my first lecture with the Department of Biosciences, hosted by CEES. Two years ago, I attended the public Kristine Bonnevie lectures with popular science writer Carl Zimmer and award winning neuroscientist Cori Bargmann, titled “Genes, evolution, and the origins of social behavior”. We also celebrated the 100 year anniversary of Kristine Bonnevie becoming the first female professor in Norway. These lectures inspired me to join IBV and pursue my Masters here. Today is another birthday, another set of Kristine Bonnevie Lectures, and to celebrate, UiO is providing everyone with cake!

Published Aug. 13, 2014 7:06 PM

It feels great to be reunited with my study species, kelp! This summer, I took a  ForBio class in Bergen: Kelp communities: marine macroalgae and associated flora and fauna. I spent 10 days collecting samples by wading, snorkeling, and boating, then subsequently identifying the catch with some of the top seaweed and marine invertebrate biologists in Scandinavia. See some of the neat critters we found... and check out ForBio's homepage for upcoming courses!

Published Mar. 17, 2014 10:49 PM

In the spirit of St. Patrick's Day, my upcoming Plant Systematics course, and the spring fever epidemic that is catching in Oslo, here is something a bit greener. I present, Hagen (the garden), an assortment of pictures taken during the beginning of the Fall Semester just outside of the KB Hus. Enjoy!

Published Mar. 12, 2014 8:39 PM

Three ongoing classes this Spring, BIO4400, BIO4320 & MBV4110, expose students to tiny marine critters, or provide a closer look at macroscopic organisms, (e.g. my study organism: kelp!). "Marine Pelagic Oceanography" introduces students to the processes of the sea, including three expeditions out on the water in Oslofjorden. "Systematics and Ecology of Marine Algae" provides on overview of the global diversity of algal species, with a special focus on Norway's intriguing flora. The "Electron Microscopy" course provides a tool to view any organism in finer detail, marine or terrestrial. Take at look for yourself to see some examples of what Master students at IBV are viewing  under the microscope.

Published Jan. 25, 2014 9:25 PM

Winter is my favorite time of year in Oslo. What is there to do? Plenty! From “friluftsidrett” (outdoor sports) to indoor attractions, Oslo has a plethora of good times to be had. Check out these trip ideas from Master students at IBV.

Published Nov. 29, 2013 7:44 AM

The temperatures are dropping. The Julebord (Christmas party) is planned. The Julemarkeder (Christmas markets) have started. The Thanksgiving turkeys in the U.S. have been diminished to leftovers. The season of giving has arrived! Whether you are looking for gifts for your own wish-list, or something meaningful for someone else in your life, check out these highly recommended biology-related books from folks at the Kristine Bonnevie Hus.

Published Nov. 21, 2013 1:24 PM

During the last few days of October, I volunteered at the Nordic Marine Science Conference in Asker, Norway. This joint meeting hosted by the Norwegian Oceanographic Society (NHF) and Swedish Society of Marine Sciences (SHF) included three days of talks and presentations from students and researchers working throughout Northern Europe. Among this gregarious, seafaring bunch, the University of Oslo was well-represented.

Published Nov. 7, 2013 5:52 PM

Not all of us dive. That's why aquariums are AMAZING! We have a glimpse into the deep blue without ever getting wet. Behind the glass, spiny stickleback, flat flounder, bright anemones, and sluggish snails dance about, either starring back at us or waving their long tentacles. This post is a tribute to the folks who keep these windows into the sea (and their inhabitants) healthy and happy, first off with the little aquarium at UiO, Steinbiten Akvarieforening, and then with the larger Drøbak Akvarium, just south of Oslo.

Published Oct. 24, 2013 3:44 PM

Benjamin is a fisherman of a different fin. Intstead of cod, salmon, or stickleback, Benjamin is writing his Masters at the CEES and working with IMR on a project about the Corkwing wrasse, an iPhone-sized fish known for its showy blue scales, taste for salmon lice, and male "cross-dressers" or sneakers (males mimicking females). This is his second year invetigating the effects of size-dependent fishing on the proportion of sneaker-males in populations in Norway.

Published Oct. 17, 2013 8:54 AM

Anyone working in a scientific field, especially biology, attends conferences. We anticipate conferences, feeling mixed excitement and dread, eagerness and fear. Conferences present a rare opportunity to take off the lab gloves, lay down the butterfly net, shut down the computers, and interact with other people just as nerdy and excited about finite details of some topic as us. During conferences, we take a step back, remember why we spend hours upon hours counting fish scales, recognize our place in society, and, in doing so, leave our comfort zone.

Published Oct. 16, 2013 1:31 PM

Biology is vast, covering many diverse fields, from human medicine to the breeding behavior of toads. The study of ecology, often depicted by rugged, safari-hat-wearing field biologists tracking the interactions of butterflies or lemurs in their habitat, is generally quite different than the model-heavy and lab-based study of evolution, especially genetics. The Center for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES) aims to connect these divergent fields, creating a more holistic understanding of life.

Published Oct. 9, 2013 2:46 PM

Today, I joined the Biologisk fagutvalg (Biology Student council) fossil tour with a paleontologist, Hans Arne Nakrem, from the Natural History Museum. We took a city bus just a few minutes south of Oslo to the island of Malmøya.

Published Oct. 9, 2013 2:24 PM

Oslo, Norway is a small city of 600 thousand, nestled at the top of a fjord (aptly named Oslofjord).Why am I here? Like most things in biology, there is no simple answer. Here is my abbreviated story, synthesized into three main bullets…