Wavelet-based scale estimation of geophysical phenomena in the ocean and atmosphere

In this project we will utilize the growing database of global satellite remote sensing observations, along with advanced signal processing techniques, to make much improved scale estimates of a variety of dynamical phenomena in the Earth system.

Illustration

Satellite-derived sea surface temperatures showing eddies generated at the flanks of the Gulf Stream. 

Dynamical processes and phenomena in the Earth system can be classified—and understood—in terms of their spatial and temporal scales. Eddies in the ocean and atmosphere, for example, have scales that reflect the hydrodynamic instability mechanisms that created them.

Clouds, similarly, consist of smaller cloud elements that are the result of complex interplay between large-scale dynamics, small-scale turbulent eddies, and cloud microphysics. So by observing spatial and temporal scales, we can learn much about the dynamics that govern key processes in the climate system.

In this project we will utilize the growing database of global satellite remote sensing observations, along with advanced signal processing techniques, to make much improved scale estimates of a variety of dynamical phenomena in the Earth system.

Specifically, we will utilize wavelet techniques that allow for an optimal ability to observe both scale and location of a given process. So we will ask: what are the dominant scales in different locations and at different times?

We will focus on characterising eddies in the ocean and atmosphere and spatial heteorogenities in clouds. The new estimates will be used to advance our fundamental understanding and theoretical models of the phenomena at play.

Requirements

  • MSc in geophysics or physics, preferably in oceanography, meteorology or computational physics.
  • Candidates with experience in signal processing and numerical methods will be prioritized.

Supervisors

Professor Pål Erik Isachsen

Professor Trude Storelvmo

Call 2: Project start autumn 2022

This project is in call 2, starting autumn 2022. 

Published Aug. 20, 2020 12:54 PM - Last modified Nov. 17, 2020 3:22 PM