News

News and "In media" articles where researchers from the Section for Geology and geophysics have contributed. The list is not exhaustive and postings are mostly Norwegian.

Research on the Earth and the climate is among subjects which have given UiO a place among the best. Illustration: Colourbox.com
Published May 19, 2020 12:47 PM

Researchers in Earth & Environmental Sciences at the Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Oslo achieve a high score on the Nature Index for 2020. Their research is now ranked 8th in Europe, and 3rd in Europe outside the UK.

The University of Oslo Library with NGWM-conference banners: Hans Arne Nakrem/UiO
Published Jan. 17, 2020 3:34 PM

The 34. Nordic Geological Winter Meeting (NGWM20) was held 8-10. January 2020 at the University of Oslo. For the first time it was a own session for "Geoeducation" on the programme. With over 50 participants this was well visited. Here are some photos. 

34th Nordic Geological Winter Meeting (NGWM20), 8-10. January 2020, Oslo (UiO). Poster: NGF
Published Jan. 8, 2020 3:53 PM

The 34th Nordic Geological Winter Meeting (NGWM20) was opened Wednesday 8th January. The Geological Society of Norway is organizer with Dept. of Geosciences, NHM and The Science Library as contributors. Venue is University of Oslo, Blindern. The conference is fully-packed.

Professor of geophysics Trond Helge Torsvik, Dept. of Geosciences, UiO. Photo: Private
Published Nov. 21, 2019 3:30 PM

Professor of geophysics Trond H. Torsvik from CEED and the Department of Geosciences, and Professor II of meteorology Michael Schultz, the GEO-department and The Norwegian Meteorological Institute appear on the Web of Science Group's list over global highly cited researchers. The list is based on citation on the 1 % top articles by field for 2008-18.  

More water goes into the globe than what comes out. Illustrationphoto: colourbox.com
Published May 31, 2019 2:41 PM

Doctoral Research Fellow Krister Karlsen at CEED and GEO has received attention for his research on water that is slowly drained into the Earth by subduction. There is more water entering the interior of the Earth than what comes out, but the time horizon is very long. Read interview in the New Scientist.