5th DNVA-RSE Norway-Scotland Waves Symposium

The symposium is a follow-up of four highly successful previous symposia, held 14-15 October 2008 in the Norwegian Academy in Oslo, 1-2 November 2010 in RSE in Edinburgh, 2013 Oslo and 2015 Edinburgh.  Topics of this year's symposium include: internal waves, waves and ice, freak waves and wave-structure interaction as well as related aspects of stratified and buoyancy-driven oceanic flows. 

The scope of the programme will reflect the ongoing wave research projects in Norway and Scotland individually and in collaboration and it will include a special session celebrating the 6oth birthday of John Grue, the co-Director of the DNVA-RSE Waves symposia since their inception.

 

 

Introduction

There is high level research activity and common research interest in the topic of water waves including internal waves and surface waves in universities in Norway and Scotland, as well as existing embryonic collaborations on the subject between research groups in the two countries. This specialist symposium is organised under the auspices of the agreement signed in 2005 between the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA) and The Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE) to promote increased collaboration between the two national academies and the research communities in their respective countries. This 3rd Norway-Scotland DNVA-RSE waves symposium is a follow-up of two highly successful previous symposia, held 14-15 October 2008 in the Norwegian Academy in Oslo and 1-2 November 2010 in RSE in Edinburgh, 2013 Oslo and 2015 Edinburgh.

Topics of this year's symposium include: internal waves, waves and ice, freak waves and wave-structure interaction as well as related aspects of stratified and buoyancy-driven oceanic flows are studied by scientists in applied mathematics, physics, engineering and earth sciences. In the open sea, the waves carry large amounts of energy. Research on internal waves relates to ocean circulation studies, and in the more general context, to climate research. The detailed knowledge of surface waves is particularly of direct industrial relevance to offshore engineering including installations for renewable energy and hazards in UK and Norwegian waters.

The main aims of the Symposium will be:

  1. to expose the present scope of research activity relating to water waves in the individual countries,
  2. to provide advanced knowledge to Norwegian and Scottish graduate students working in this area,
  3. to explore in detail the initiation of new bi- or multi-lateral collaborative research projects involving Norwegian and Scottish scientists in this area and the extension and strengthening of existing cross-national collaborations of this kind,
  4. to identify fundamental, applied and industrial research problems with water waves that are relevant in Norway and Scotland as well as internationally and
  5. to promote the appropriate transfer of academic research advances to the industrial (offshore) sector.

Program

The symposium program will consist of 30 invited plenary lectures, on: ocean surface waves, waves and ice, currents and internal waves. The talks will cover nonlinear theories, numerical calculations, results from field work and laboratory experiments. Each talk will have a duration of 20min + 5min questions.

Monday 9th of January, from 09:00 to 19:00, 16 lectures

Tuesday 10th September, from 9:30 to 17:00, 14 lectures

The complete program will be announced on the Symposium Web-page by 20th of December.

Each presenter should prepare an extended abstract (2 A4 pages) of their talk, for publication on the Symposium web-page.

A banquet will be given in the Academy on the evening of Monday 9th of January (invitation only).

Important dates:

  • Acceptance of invitation (as soon as possible).
  •  1st December 2016, deadline, provisional title of talk.
  • 3 January, 2017 deadline, 2 page summary, for publication on the Symposium Web-page

List of Invited Plenary Lectures:

  1. M. Carr and P. Davies; Head on collision of mode 1 and mode 2 internal solitary-like waves
  2. S. Dalziel; Cranking up the nonlinearity of experimental wave-wave interactions
  3. M. Stastna & D. Deepwell; Simulations of breaking and broadening of large amplitude internal waves
  4. V. Vlasenko & N. Stashchuk; Internal tides near the Celtic Sea shelf break: a new look at a well-known problem
  5. T. Soomere; Water level climatology in the Baltic Sea
  6. P. Linden and G. Hughes; Mixing efficiency in run-down gravity current
  7. M. Hayatdavoodi; On some wave-structure interaction solutions of the Green-Naghdi equations
  8. S. Maldonado, M. Creed and A. Borthwick; Current–induced bedload sediment transport
  9. B. Sutherland; Flows Induced by Internal Wavepackets Manifest as Vertical Modes
  10. B. Molin; On resonant modes in moonpools with restrictions or recesses
  11. C. Kharif; Whitham approach for the study of nonlinear waves on vertically sheared current in shallow water
  12. O. Faltinsen; Sloshing in marine applications
  13. A. Nestergaard; Air gap and wave impact loads on column stabilized unit
  14. A. Korobkin; Water wave diffraction by vertical near-circular cylinder
  15. F. Diaz; Real world ocean rogue waves explained without the modulational instability
  16. D. Clamond; Dispersion improved model for long internal gravity waves
  17. H. Kalisch; Particle dynamics and wave breaking in the KdV equation for free surface shear flows
  18. J. Lacasce; The vertical structure of Rossby waves
  19. A. Marchenko;TBA
  20. G. Sutherland;TBA
  21. J. Rabault;TBA
  22. P. Wadhams; Recent wave-ice measurements in the marginal ice zone of the Beaufort Sea
  23. P. Sutherland; Rapid wave field evolution in the near-edge marginal ice zone
  24. J. Gemmrich; Satellite-based SAR observations of waves in the Beaufort Sea marginal ice zone
  25. O. Gramstad; Modulational instability in JONSWAP sea states
  26. E. Bitner-Gregersen and A. Toffoli; Crossing seas and occurrence of rogue waves
  27. M. Donelan; Unmasking the Rogue -- The Making of the Andrea Wave
  28. A. Chabchoub; Rogue Waves within the Framework of Weakly Nonlinear Evolution Equations – Applicability and Limitations
  29. T. Waseda; Kinematics of freak waves in the ocean and ship response
  30. S. Støle-Hentschel; Surface wave analysis based on coherent and incoherent radar measurements

 

Co-Directors:  P.A. Davies (Dundee) & Atle Jensen

Planning Group: A Jensen, K Trulsen, P A Davies, B Gjevik

Local Organising Group: A. Jensen, G. Sutherland and J. Rabault

Hosted under the auspices of the bilateral agreement between: The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA) and The Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE)

Sponsors: DNVA, RSE, The Research Council of Norway, Småforsk, Telford Institute, MASTS, Univ. of Oslo, Univ. of Dundee

 

 

Hotel

En-block reservations have been made at Hotel Bristol, Kristian IV's gate 7, 0164 Oslo

IMPORTANT: booking with special rates of NOK 1295 (single room) / 1595 (double room) (per night) are done. Each participant should have got information by email.

Travel

Travel from Oslo Airport Gardermoen (OSL) to Oslo:

  1. Airport Express Train (Flytoget) to Nationaltheatret; 6 departures per hour; takes 20 min; fare, NOK 180. Short walk to Hotel Bristol - 5min.

How to get from Hotel Bristol to the Academy, Street Address, Drammensveien 78, Oslo:

  1. by foot (30 min).
  2. by Tram 13 from Nationaltheatret (on street level), to Stop SKARPSNO (four stops), which is next to the Academy in Drammensveien 78.
Published Dec. 14, 2016 1:34 PM - Last modified Dec. 14, 2016 3:44 PM