"The Science Of EST" ep. 6: The quiet Sun magnetic field

Quiet Sun magnetic fields are thought to significantly contribute to the energy and heating of the solar atmosphere. The question is: how much?

Rebecca A. Robinson, PhD student at Rosseland Centre for Solar Physics, UiO.

The quiet Sun (usually shortened as QS) is represented by the regions of the Sun's photosphere that have relatively weak magnetic field when compared to the strong fields found in active regions and sunspots. Even though the quiet Sun is not as locally energetic as active regions, the majority of the Sun's photosphere is quiet most of the time. This makes the quiet Sun an important area to study.

Because of their consistent and relatively ubiquitous presence across the photosphere, quiet Sun magnetic fields are thought to significantly contribute to the energy and heating of the solar atmosphere. The question is: how much?

Image may contain: Orange, Red, Amber.
The quiet Sun at disk center measured by Hinode on 10 March 2007, 11:37 UT. Credit: ISAS/JAXA, NAOJ, NASA, STFC, ESA. 

While active regions contribute to atmospheric heating over short timescales, QS magnetic fields are expected to contribute over long-term scales. In fact, the total flux content of the QS has been measured to be slightly larger than the flux content of all active regions during solar maximum, suggesting that the QS is likely a significant contributor to the atmospheric energy budget!

To understand the importance of the quiet Sun to the upper layers of the solar atmosphere, we need extremely high resolution observations of the magnetic field in such regions. By means of observations using the spectropolarimetric instrumentation on the European Solar Telescope, we will better understand the strength, distribution, and energy of the magnetic field in the QS. This will allow us to get a better grasp on the link between the ubiquitous quiet Sun and the energetic solar atmosphere.


The Science Of EST” is a series of short posts for social media where researchers talk in a plain language about a particular topic of their choice and how EST will improve our knowledge on that topic. The aim is to raise awareness among the general public about why solar physicists study the Sun, what the hot topics in today’s solar physics are, and how EST will leap forward our knowledge of the Sun. 

 

All the posts can be found in "The Science Of EST" (ext. link).

By Rebecca A. Robinson
Published Mar. 31, 2020 1:54 PM - Last modified Mar. 31, 2020 2:15 PM