Research news

Chugach Mountains, Alaska:  RapidEye satellite false colour image of the lower part of Martin River Glacier in the Chugach Mountains, Alaska. The ripples and curved moraines are an indication of unstable, episodic or pulsating glacier flow. Copyright Planet Labs, Inc. CC-BY-SA 4.0.
Published Mar. 12, 2019 3:55 PM

A new methodology to combine heaps of satellite images allows researchers from University of Oslo with colleagues to create a complete time series of glacier movement. To demonstrate the methodology, they created a map of ice flow every month, over several years, covering several mountain ranges in Southern Alaska and Canada. Once created, the dataset revealed several sudden glacier speed-ups and slow-downs.

Greenland is the largest island on Earth. In central Greenland researchers have located a corridor with thinned-out landmasses running from east to west, which they explain by Greenland drifting over a stationary hotspot. The thin lithosphere assisted volcanic activities across Greenland 60 million years ago. Illustration photo: Colourbox.no
Published Nov. 16, 2018 3:20 PM

Volcanic activity primarily focuses at plate boundaries on Earth. But volcanoes can also form far away from plate boundaries due to plumes of hot material rising from the Earth’s deep interior. Eventually this material reaches the surface and breaks through the Earth’s crust to form a volcano – a so-called “hotspot”. Scientists now present a theory of how this type of hotspot activity can explain massive, past volcanic eruptions in Greenland and in the North Atlantic.