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Andreia Plaza-Faverola. Photo: Torger Grytå
Published Nov. 25, 2019 2:19 PM

Friday 22. Nov. was the Else-Ragnhild Neumann Award for Women in Geosciences awarded for the second time. The award goes to a woman who through her Ph.D. or postdoctoral work has made a significant contribution to geoscientific research. The award is presented by CEED and the Dept. of Geosciences, UiO, and it was Andreia Plaza-Faverola, UiT, who became the award winner for 2019.

Professor of geophysics Trond Helge Torsvik, Dept. of Geosciences, UiO. Photo: Private
Published Nov. 21, 2019 3:30 PM

Professor of geophysics Trond H. Torsvik from CEED and the Department of Geosciences, and Professor II of meteorology Michael Schultz, the GEO-department and The Norwegian Meteorological Institute appear on the Web of Science Group's list over global highly cited researchers. The list is based on citation on the 1 % top articles by field for 2008-18.  

Published Nov. 15, 2018 2:36 PM

This past week, 14 international and interdisciplinary early career researchers from all over the world met in the fjord-side town of Drøbak, south of Oslo. The #YoungCEED18 workshop - the first of its kind under the “Young CEED” initiative - aimed for a fresh take on the enigmatic process of how new subduction zones form.

Greenland is the largest island on Earth. In central Greenland researchers have located a corridor with thinned-out landmasses running from east to west, which they explain by Greenland drifting over a stationary hotspot. The thin lithosphere assisted volcanic activities across Greenland 60 million years ago. Illustration photo: Colourbox.no
Published Nov. 12, 2018 10:03 PM

Volcanic activity primarily focuses at plate boundaries on Earth. But volcanoes can also form far away from plate boundaries due to plumes of hot material rising from the Earth’s deep interior. Eventually this material reaches the surface and breaks through the Earth’s crust to form a volcano – a so-called “hotspot”. Scientists now present a theory of how this type of hotspot activity can explain massive, past volcanic eruptions in Greenland and in the North Atlantic region.